Friday Morning Links on Homelessness (and R)

First, creating an infinite link loop while this post is on LoCO’s blog roll…

‘Til the Dumpsters are Full’: Today’s EPD Purge of the Devil’s Playground Homeless Encampment

I’d like to bring your attention to this quote:

““Both of us have a job. Right now it’s just part time, but we’re trying,” said Gerald who said he worked 17 hours this week at Pacific Choice Seafood. He’s in his third week of work there processing crab. “

Anyone else remember Pacific Seafood’s role in Measure R?  a)  It would have been cool for them to pay wages that might allow them to pay Gerald enough money to put a roof over his head.   b)  Why again is Pacific Choice Seafood a good thing for our economy?  We need a local fish market where local fisherwomen can sell there fish to us.  Think of it as our local twist on the farmer’s market phenomena.  This should be a no-brainer, and should result in local fisherwomen and their employees keeping more of their money.  And apparently it may put pressure on a seemingly corrupt seafood processing infrastructure that depends on paying salaries which do not support one able to put a roof over one’s head.

(Note:  Thank you LoCO for getting interviews.  This is an example of reporting, something our new media models do not often support, let’s appreciated it when it exists.)

Joe Kerr in the thread for this article also noticed this parallel story in the NYT regarding a similar kick-the-bums-out move in San Jose.

Few Options for Homeless as San Jose Clears Camp

Was there some sort of state-wide memo sent out I wonder?  Why are we doing this in December when any shelter may be the difference between life and death?  *represses inner cynic*


Tiny bit more …

The NYT article contained this nugget.

According to Zillow Real Estate Research, the median rent in San Jose as of October was $2,934 a month. For the wider San Jose metropolitan area, it was $3,163 a month — up 16 percent in one year.

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5 thoughts on “Friday Morning Links on Homelessness (and R)

  1. Mary Ella Anderson says:

    If the business interests are opposed to paying higher wages, the other option would be to bring the cost of living down, starting with rents which are higher than the average wage can comfortably afford. More money going into housing means less money going into other areas of the economy.

    1. Absolutely. Somehow, I get the feeling a rent control measure would suffer the same fate as R right now. We need to change that and find some solutions that can be simple and revolutionary. Things like having employers pay living wages or forcing the over-inflated rental market come down to earth were it can serve the public again instead of owners.

  2. Thanks for making the ‘loop’ on this. We need to really get going on something concrete for those who fall through the cracks such as the couple interviewed. Sounds like tomorrow is a good time to start: the next Affordable Homeless Housing Alternatives meeting is at 11 am this Saturday the 6th, at the Jefferson Community Center in Eureka!

  3. MOLA42 says:

    It’s easy to marginalize the homeless by calling them “tweekers” and then dismissing them from our minds.

    We do need to be reminded that while there are drug abusers among the homeless… a lot of them are certifiably “us”. They lived their lives just like we do now… but when the economic bubble burst they found themselves with less than nothing and no way to get it back.

    Each recession we suffer makes more middle class folks into the desperately poor. And the price of admission into the middle class just continues to rise. Education and housing are becoming luxuries… all the while the top of the economic heap (both personal and corporate) spend their days, hours and minutes worrying about getting more and sharing less.

    Get a job? Many of the homeless do have jobs (as the person quoted in the article). What do they need to do to catch a break from the rest of us?

    LJ: You have done here the first thing that needs to be done for the homeless… putting a human face on people the rest of us refuse to see.

  4. “It’s easy to marginalize the homeless by calling them “tweekers” and then dismissing them from our minds.” Exactly.

    “Education and housing are becoming luxuries… all the while the top of the economic heap (both personal and corporate) spend their days, hours and minutes worrying about getting more and sharing less.” Yup.

    thanks for the kind words M42 (and reader #1). Anything I do to try to change the narrative of our policies pales in comparison to those out there doing the work – people like Betty Chin, Feed the People volunteers, John Chiv when he volunteers, etc. Having said that, gracious thank yous for the thought.

    Oops reader #1, I’m reading this on Sunday.

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